Distinguished Service Award

The Society for Mathematical Biology Distinguished Service Award honors service in the field of mathematical biology, service for the Society of Mathematical Biology, and contributions beyond achievements in research. The nominee must have made an exceptional contribution to the field of mathematical biology and in its advancement outside of research. The award recipient will receive a cash award of $500 and a certificate at the award ceremony in the Annual Meeting of the Society.

Recipients of the Distinguished Service Award
2021 – Anna Mummert, Marshall University
2019 – Stacey R. Smith?, University of Ottawa

Bio: Stacey Smith? (the question mark is part of her name) is a professor of disease modelling at the University of Ottawa in Canada. Using mathematics, she studies infectious diseases such as HIV, malaria, human papillomavirus, COVID-19, influenza, neglected tropical diseases… and zombies. She’s published over 100 academic articles; is a winner of a Guinness World Record for her work on modelling a zombie invasion; was the winner of the 2015 Mathematics Ambassador award, given by Canada’s Partners in Research association; and won the 2018 Society for Mathematical Biology Distinguished Service Award for exceptional contribution to the field of mathematical biology and its advancement outside of research. She was the first University of Ottawa employee to transition… but won’t be the last! Outside of her day job, she has more than 20 books to her name, including Bookwyrm (ATB Publishing), Who is the Doctor, Who’s 50 and The Doctors Are In (ECW Press), Look at the Size of That Thing! (Pencil Tip Publishing), as well as a Black Archive on Doctor Who and the Silurians (Obverse Books), guides to the wonderful world of Doctor Who. She’s also the editor extraordinaire of the Outside In series of pop-culture reviews with a twist (ATB Publishing), covering Doctor Who, Star Trek, Buffy, Angel, Firefly and The X-Files. Oh, and she’s the world’s leading expert on the transmission of Bieber Fever, but let’s not worry about that one.

2017 – Raymond Mejia, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Comments are closed.