2018 SMB Awards for Established Scientists

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 19, 2018

Society for Mathematical Biology Announces Recipients of its 2018 Awards for Established Scientists

The Society for Mathematical Biology is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2018 Society Awards for established mathematical biologists.  These individuals will be honored at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology, to be held at the McGill University in Montreal, Canada from July 22-26. The awardees are listed below:

Arthur Sherman, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, will receive the Arthur T. Winfree Prize for his work on biophysical mechanisms underlying insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells.  Since insulin plays a key role in maintaining blood glucose, this is of basic physiological interest and is also important for understanding the causes and treatment of type 2 diabetes, which arises from a combination of defects in insulin secretion and insulin action.  The Arthur T. Winfree Prize was established in memory of Arthur T. Winfree’s contributions to mathematical biology. This prize is to honor a theoretician whose research has inspired significant new biology. The Winfree Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The winner is expected to give a talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology (Montreal 2019).

 

Robert J. Smith, University of Ottawa, will be the recipient of the Distinguished Service Award for successfully using pop culture to showcase the power of mathematical modeling of infectious diseases, sparking the interest of mathematical and non-mathematical audiences worldwide. His academic paper on the mathematical modeling of zombies, published in 2009, went viral. The article has received 114 academic citations, has 45,000 hits on Google and was the subject of a massive media campaign. His zombie paper was the number one story on the BBC for 24 hours and was featured in the Wall Street Journal. The Society for Mathematical Biology Distinguished Service Award honors service in the field of mathematical biology, service for the Society of Mathematical Biology, and contributions beyond achievements in research. Dr. Smith?  received a cash award of $500 and at the 2018 SMB annual meeting in Montreal.

 

Nick Monk, University of Sheffield, will be the recipient of the John Jungck Prize for Excellence in Education. This Prize is given for significant contributions to education in mathematical biology, including a distinguished record of excellence in classroom instruction, mentorship of students, development of novel educational methods, materials, and programs, promotion of scientific outreach, a track record of attracting new students to the field of mathematical biology, and creation of an environment exceptionally conducive to education in mathematical biology. This Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to Dr. Monk who will  give a talk at the annual meeting of the Society in Montreal in 2019.

 

Helen Byrne, University of Oxford, will be the recipient of the Leah Edelstein-Keshet Prize for her work focused on the development and analysis of mathematical and computational models that describe biomedical systems, with particular application to the growth and treatment of solid tumors, wound healing and tissue engineering. Her contributions have been numerous and impactful by identifying mechanisms responsible for observed in tumors. This award recognizes an established scientist with a demonstrated track record of exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology and/or has effectively developed mathematical models impacting biology. Dr. Byrne has made outstanding scientific achievements coupled with her record of active leadership in mentoring scientific careers The Edelstein-Keshet Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The winner is expected to give a talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology in Montreal in 2019.

 

Naoki Masuda, University of Bristol, will be the recipient of the Junior Akira Okubo Prize for his outstanding breadth of research, ranging from neuroscience to epidemiology to game theory, and for the outstanding originality of his ideas. Impressive is that some of his best papers are single-author works. Also,  he has worked extensively in the field of network epidemiology, making it a new hot area of work. In this version of the Prize it honors a junior living scientist for outstanding and innovative theoretical work, for establishing superb conceptual ideas, for solving tough theoretical problems, and/or for uniting theory and data to advance a biological subject. The prize is jointly administered by the Society for Mathematical Biology and the Japanese Society for Mathematical Biology.  The Akira Okubo Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The Okubo Prize winner is expected to give a talk at the SMB meeting in Montreal in 2019.

 

Francis Woodhouse, University of Cambridge, H. D. Landahl Mathematical Biophysics Award. This Award will recognize the scientific contributions made by a postdoctoral fellow who is making exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology. The award is acknowledged with a certificate, and a cash prize of USD $500. The award recipient will receive a certificate at the Society for Mathematical Biology Awards Ceremony at the Annual Meeting of the Society in Montreal in 2019.

Ramit Mehr, Bar-Ilan University, and Eberhard Voit, Georgia Tech will be named Fellows of the Society. The Society for Mathematical Biology Fellows Program honors members of the Society who are recognized by the scientific and scholarly community as distinguished contributors to the discipline and also contributions to the Society. These honors will be bestowed at the SMB annual meeting in Montreal in 2019.

The Society for Mathematical Biology promotes the development and dissemination of research and education at the interface between the mathematical and biological sciences. The Society serves a diverse community of researchers and educators in academia, in industry, and in government agencies throughout the world. Through its awards program, the Society honors its members and recognizes excellence in mathematical biology. 

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