Prizes

 
Through its awards program, the Society for Mathematical Biology honors its members and recognizes excellence in mathematical biology. The Society offers awards in eight different categories. Nominations for the awards are solicited and evaluated by the Society for Mathematical Biology Awards Committee. The Society of Mathematical Biology is now accepting nominations for the 2017 Akira Okubo Prize, Arthur T. Winfree Prize, Lee Segel Prize, Fellows of the Society of Mathematical Biology , Distinguished Service Award, John Jungck Prize for Excellence in Education , H. D. Landahl Mathematical Biophysics Award , Leah Edelstein-Keshet Prize through December 16th, 2016. Society members are encouraged to nominate candidates by submitting a nomination form and the required materials in PDF format to the Society Secretary Dr. Amina Eladdadi (E-mail: eladdadi@gmail.com). The nominator must submit:

  • A letter (no more than 4 pages) describing the nominee's qualifications and commenting on the nominee's scientific contributions for the society award,
  • Two supporting letters from other Society members, and
  • The nominee's curriculum vitae, including all publications.

 

Akira Okubo Prize

The Akira Okubo Fund was established in memory of Akira Okubo, who made major contributions to many fields, including mathematical ecology and oceanography. Okubo was widely recognized for his scientific work, as well as for his exceptional humanity. In 2017, the Akira Okubo Prize will honor a senior living scientist (associate/full professor or equivalent position) for outstanding and innovative theoretical work, for establishing superb conceptual ideas, for solving tough theoretical problems, and/or for uniting theory and data to advance a biological subject. The following criteria will be used for ranking nominations and selecting the award winner: originality (discovering a new theory and opening a new research direction), breakthrough (solving outstanding problems in the field), new synthesis (leading to a new research area), and impact already made, or expected, on subsequent studies. The prize is jointly administered by the Society for Mathematical Biology and the Japanese Society for Mathematical Biology.The Akira Okubo Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The Okubo Prize winner is expected to give a talk at the joint meeting of the SMB and JSMB in 2018. In the next cycle (Year 2019), the award will be offered for a junior investigator (assistant professor or equivalent position).

 

Arthur T. Winfree Prize

The Arthur T. Winfree Prize was established in memory of Arthur T. Winfree's contributions to mathematical biology. Winfree was one of the legendary figures in the field, one of the very few who combined brilliant theory with imaginative and masterful experiments. His pioneering work in biological periodicity and pattern formation built a foundation for current research. Winfree's genius was frequently hidden by his modest, even self-effacing manner. Beyond his scientific contributions, he was an exemplary scientist and human being. The objective of the Arthur T. Winfree Prize is to honor a theoretician whose research has inspired significant new biology. Nominations of individuals to be considered for the prize may focus on a single paper or series of papers which illustrate the close connection between theory and experiments, or may be based upon a larger body of theoretical work produced by the individual which has led to significant new biological understanding affecting observation/experiments. The Winfree Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The winner is expected to give a talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology in 2017.

 

Lee Segel Prize

To honor the enormous contribution that Lee Segel made to the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology and the field of mathematical biology as a whole, the Society of Mathematical Biology is funding a series of prizes based on papers published in the BMB. Every two years, prizes will be awarded for best paper and best student paper published in the BMB in the previous two years.

 

Fellows of the Society for Mathematical Biology

The Society for Mathematical Biology Fellows Program honors members of the Society who are recognized by the scientific and scholarly community as distinguished for their contributions to the discipline. Any Society for Mathematical Biology regular member in good standing is eligible to be nominated to be a Fellow. For these purposes, a regular member is defined as a non-student, dues-paying member. A nominee is expected to have been a member of the profession for at least ten years. Member of the profession is defined as holding a faculty or independent research position. Society for Mathematical Presidents will automatically become Fellows upon election, if they are not Fellows already. The society will name up to four fellows per nomination cycle. The award will consist of a certificate, which it will be handed in the Awards ceremony at the Annual Meeting.

 

Distinguished Service Award

The Society for Mathematical Biology Distinguished Service Award honors service in the field of mathematical biology, service for the Society of Mathematical Biology, and contributions beyond achievements in research. The nominee must have made an exceptional contribution to the field of mathematical biology and in its advancement outside of research. The award recipient will receive a cash award of $500 and a certificate at the award ceremony in the Annual Meeting of the Society in 2017.

 

John Jungck Prize for Excellence in Education

John R. Jungck is the founder of the Society for Mathematical Biology Education Committee. He is well-known for his contributions to mathematical and theoretical biology education, and promoting interdisciplinary work at the interface between science, technology, and the humanities. The John Jungck Prize for Excellence in Education is given for significant contributions to education in mathematical biology, including a distinguished record of excellence in classroom instruction, mentorship of research scientists at any level, development of novel educational methods, materials, or programs, promotion of scientific outreach efforts to the public or to youth, a track record of attracting new students to the field of mathematical biology, or creation of an environment exceptionally conducive to education in mathematical biology. The Jungck Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The winner is expected to give a talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology in 2017.

 

H. D. Landahl Mathematical Biophysics Award

Herbert D. Landahl became the second President of the Society for Mathematical Biology in 1981. He was a pioneer in the field of mathematical biology and became the first doctoral student in Nicolas Rashevsky's mathematical biology program at the University of Chicago. He was a professor at the University of Chicago until 1967, and then joined the University of California, San Francisco until his retirement. In 2017, the H. D. Landahl Mathematical Biophysics Award will recognize the scientific contributions made by a graduate student fellow who is making exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology. The award recipient will receive a certificate at the Society for Mathematical Biology Awards Ceremony, and an invitation to attend to the Annual Meeting of the Society in 2017. In the next cycle (Year 2019), the award it will recognize a postdoctoral fellow with a record of exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology.

 

Leah Edelstein-Keshet Prize

Leah Edelstein-Keshet became the first woman President of the Society for Mathematical Biology in 1995. She is the author of the influential book, "Mathematical Models in Biology" in the SIAM Series "Classics in Applied Mathematics". Leah Edelstein-Keshet is well-known for her outstanding scientific contributions and impact on the field of mathematical biology and biophysics. She has served as a role model and mentor in mathematical biology and her scientific insight has positively influenced many students over the years. In 2017, the award will recognize a woman in an early stage of her career (assistant professor level at the nomination deadline) who is making exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology, developing a strong independent research program, and exhibiting a continuously high level of scientific endeavor and leadership. The Edelstein-Keshet Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The winner is expected to give a talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology in 2017.In the next cycle (Year 2019), the award will recognize an established scientist (associate, or full professor) with a demonstrated track record of exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology and/or has effectively developed mathematical models impacting biology. At the full professor rank, we expect that the recipient will exemplify a high level of scientific endeavor and leadership. This person should have made outstanding scientific achievements coupled with a record of active leadership in mentoring scientific careers.